10 awesome ‘Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2012′ entries

By Ash Davies
September 26, 2012 from Blog,Inspiration

This week, the Royal Observatory of Greenwich unveiled the winners to the Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition. Here, we’ve delved through the winners, runners up and finalists to bring you the 10 most outstanding entrants and winners from this year’s competition.

Adding to the awesome, we’ve also included the photographer’s comments and the setup they used with each photo. Enjoy!

Star Icefall by Masahiro Miyasaka (Japan) – Earth & Space Winner

“The stars fell from the heavens. The stars transformed themselves into an icicle. Stars sleep eternally here.”
Canon 5D Mark II camera; Samyang 14mm f/2.8 IF ED MC Aspherical lens; ISO 5000

Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2012 Finalists and Winners

Green World by Arild Heitmann (Norway) – Earth & Space Runner Up

“This is a special shot for me since it captures the intense feeling of standing deep in the mountains, far away from light pollution, watching the finest lightshow on the planet!”
Canon 5D camera; 16–35mm f/2.8 lens at 16 mm; ISO 1600; 23-second exposure

Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2012 Finalists and Winners

Summer Nights in Michigan by Michael Rosinski (USA) – Earth & Space Commendation

“I’ve been taking combined fireflies and star trail images since 2010 – it’s a learned technique. I noticed that, due to the hot weather, the fireflies seemed to be peaking much earlier than in either 2010 or 2011: four to five weeks sooner. With the heat-wave the fireflies were going bonkers on this particular evening, so I was motivated to capture them! I had to start imaging at 11pm, as it was too light before that.”
Canon T1i camera; Canon 15–85mm zoom lens at 15mm; ISO 800; 400 25-second exposures

Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2012 Finalists and Winners

The Milky Way View from the Piton de l’Eau by Luc Perrot (Réunion Island) – Earth & Space Commendation

“Here is a picture of the Piton de l’Eau, an ancient crater filled with water. At the bottom of the picture you can see the Piton des Neiges, the highest peak of Réunion which is 3069 metres tall. I waited two years before all the combined conditions were favourable to succeed with this photo.”
Nikon D700 camera; Nikkor 24mm f/1.4 lens; ISO 3200; 15-second exposure

Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2012 Finalists and Winners

Sky away from the Lights by Tunç Tezel (Turkey) – Earth & Space Commendation

“In the evening of 12 August 2010, I went up to Uludag National Park near my hometown of Bursa, Turkey. My destination was the glacial lakes area and…my first aim was to catch the evening planets and the Moon before they set, and then watch the Perseids as the meteor shower peaked. …The lights of towns and villages down below were greatly diffused by the dust, haze and humidity accompanying the heat wave of July–August 2010. Normally, it is either very clear or the lower lands are lost under the clouds all together.”
Hutech modified Canon 5D camera; 35mm f/2 lens at f/2.8; ISO 3200; 30-second exposure

Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2012 Finalists and Winners

Transit of Venus in Hydrogen-Alpha by Chris Warren (UK) – Our Solar System Winner

“A single unprocessed raw frame shot between second and third contact. Our first and only glimpse of the transit before third contact, through a thin patch in the clouds at Blackheath in London.”
Lunt LS60THa telescope; Point Grey Grasshopper Express (ICX674) camera

Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2012 Finalists and Winners

Pleiades Cluster by Jacob von Chorus, 15 (Canada) – Young Photographer Winner

“This image was a test to see what would happen with such a long exposure. It was taken near dusk, with only two frames and an hour of exposure. This image has since become one of my best.”
Sky Watcher Equinox 80ED telescope; Celestron CG-5 mount; f/6.25 lens; Stock Canon 100D camera; ISO 800; 30-minute exposure

Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2012 Finalists and Winners

Heavenly Showers by Jathin Premjith, 15 (India) – Young Photographer Commendation

“It was breathtaking to see the whole sky filled with long streams of light and colours in the company of innumerable twinkling stars when the huge solar storm hit the Earth in January. I really like this photo because of the variation in colour from red to glowing green and I have also managed to capture Orion, Taurus, Procyon, Sirius and the Pleiades.”

Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2012 Finalists and Winners

M51 – The Whirlpool Galaxy by Martin Pugh (UK/Australia) – Overall Winner

“I was always going to be excited about this image given the exceptional seeing conditions M51 was photographed under and the addition of several hours of Ha data has really boosted the HII regions.”
Planewave 17-inch CDK telescope; Software Bisque Paramount ME mount; Apogee U16M camera

Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2012 Finalists and Winners

Origins of Life on Earth by Thomas Sullivan, 13 (USA) – Young Photographer Commendation

“All life on Earth contains material from the stars, including Bristlecone Pines of up to 4844 years old! The light is from my Dad taking a picture to the side.”
Canon 5D Mark II camera, 16mm f/2.8 lens; ISO 6400; 30-second exposure

Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2012 Finalists and Winners

  • Matt Boudwin

    the last picture and the picture from turkey added the same celestial/nebula effect on the sky